Vodafone Americas Foundation winners announced

By: Brian Dolan | Apr 8, 2009        

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CellScopeTechnology that converts a mobile phone into a compact, high-resolution, handheld microscope; A lensfree imaging platform on a mobile phone that uses digital holograms of bacteria or cells to monitor for disease; a system of wireless devices that tracks and locates survivors trapped by fires and structural collapse.

These three technologies have been selected from among more than 100 applicants to win the Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project and to share the $700,000 worth of prizes, which aim to help support the applications next phase of implementation and development.

The goal of the Wireless Innovation Project is to identify and fund unique innovations that leverage wireless technology to address critical social issues around the world. 

More on the winners from the Foundation’s press release:

Active Networked Tags for Disaster Recovery Applications – A system that uses wireless devices to track and locate survivors trapped by fires and structural collapse. The system is based on energy harvesting tags using ultra low power communications. Developed by Professors Gil Zussman, Peter Kinget, Ioannis (John) Kymissis, Dan Rubenstein, and Xiaodong Wang of Columbia University.

CelloPhone - A lensfree imaging platform on a cellphone for disease detection and diagnostics using digital holograms of the cells or bacteria, that is capable of monitoring HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and various other diseases. Developed by Dr. Aydogan Ozcan, Dr. Neven Karlovac and Dr. Yvonne Bryson of the University of California at Los Angeles.

CellScope: Mobile Microscopy for Disease Diagnosis – A conventional cell phone is transformed into a compact, high-resolution, handheld microscope with the capability of on-site disease diagnosis and wireless transmission of patient data to clinical centers for remote diagnosis & treatment. Developed by Dr. Daniel Fletcher, Dr. Erik Douglas and Dr. Wilbur Lam of the University of California at Berkeley.

See the project’s site for more information