10 digital health projects on Indiegogo

By: Aditi Pai | Jan 17, 2014        

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SkulptAimIndiegogo has kicked off the new year with a slew of new campaigns for health and fitness apps and devices. Last year, MobiHealthNews found an armband that measured workout intensity, a device that targets and estimates end times for blemishes on a user’s skin, a sensor to measure the nutritional value of different food items, and an inactivity tracker, for those who just want to make sure they aren’t sitting down too much.

Of the five campaigns MobiHealthNews looked at in November, only one product made its goal — Skulpt Aim. The company, which aims to measure a user’s body fat percentage and muscle quality in individual muscles by pressing the device against the muscles, beat its $100,000 goal by $284,509.

This year is not without some near duplicates of existing digital health devices as well as a few entirely new ideas. Another wristworn activity tracker promises to take exercising to the next level, a tricorder, which is also in the X Prize competition, raises money to make their device cheap and available to anyone, and a spirometer connects users to information about their breathing.

Atlas

Atlas

To differentiate itself from other activity trackers in the market, Atlas claims that its wrist-worn, waterproof tracker can identify almost any exercise, using a 3D motion trajectory and specific motion fingerprints for different routines. According to the company, the device can even tell the difference between a triangle push-up and regular push-up, and different swimming strokes. The display on the user’s wrist shows the type of exercises, speed at which the user is completing them and quality. If the user wants to do an unorthodox workout, Atlas will learn the movements through an analytics engine so that next time he or she exercises, the workout will be in the database.

The app also offers users training guidelines based on the work they have done at the gym so that if they’ve been focusing on one muscle group over another, the app will correct this. Finally, the app allows users to compare their form to other Atlas users in the community or challenge friends to competitions.

Through the campaign, users can get the device, a jersey and a pro membership to MapMyFitness or Fitocracy for $179.

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  • Joey Tuan

    Thanks for covering HealClick’s campaign! Just to clarify, our main goal is not to help patients find a diagnosis, but rather use patient-matching to help personalize topics and treatments reviews to their condition. However, you’re certainly right that this may very well lead to patients to bringing up new conditions, symptoms, treatments etc to discuss with their doctors. .

    http://igg.me/at/healclick