ex-Moto CEO Ed Zander: Inflection point for wireless health

By: Brian Dolan | Aug 31, 2009        

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Ed Zander, AwarepointEd Zander, the former CEO and chairman of Motorola, has joined healthcare-focused real-time location systems (RTLS) company Awarepoint as a member of its board of directors. Awarepoint’s RTLS solution is ZigBee-based.

Zander was the CEO and chairman at Motorola for about four years before resigning in late 2007 to spend more time with his family. Upon resigning from Motorola, Zander remarked that he had spent some 40 years in the technology industry. Prior to Motorola, Zander spent 15 years at Sun Microsystems and left the company after serving as its COO.

Zander’s move to Awarepoint highlights that top telecom executives have recognized wireless healthcare as a key opportunity for the telecom industry.

“Awarepoint’s success is already remarkable,” Zander stated in a company release. “With the current attention being focused on opportunities for wireless communications in healthcare, Awarepoint is poised for significant growth. I look forward to sharing my experience and advice at this inflection point in technology solutions for the worldwide healthcare market.”

For more on Zander’s appointment to Awarepoint’s board, read the entire press release after the jump:

Press Release:

Awarepoint Corporation, a provider of ZigBee-based real-time location system (RTLS) solutions to the healthcare market, today announced that Edward J. Zander has joined the company’s board of directors. Zander has spent more than 35 years in the technology sector. He has played a key role in shaping some of the major paradigm shifts in technology that impact the world today. These include the move from mainframes to minicomputers; minicomputers to workstations; PCs to networking and to the Internet; hardware to software; and the revolution in wireless devices and mobility.

Zander was most recently chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Motorola. During his tenure, he sharpened Motorola’s edge in technology innovation; delivered on 12 consecutive quarters of revenue growth; streamlined the business to increase operating efficiencies worldwide; significantly improved the balance sheet and acquired and divested businesses to strengthen the company’s competitive position.

Prior to Motorola, Zander was president and chief operating officer of Sun Microsystems. During his 15 years at the company, he built it into the pre-eminent supplier of network software infrastructure. Zander has served on the board of directors for several technology companies. Today he is a director of Netezza Corp. and was most recently announced as director of NetSuite Inc., a leading vendor of on-demand, integrated business management software suites. Zander also served as chairman of the Technology CEO Council in Washington, D.C. and has been on a number of civic and philanthropic boards. Awarepoint is growing its healthcare vision to a new generation of connected health solutions and actively building an ecosystem of partners that will enable it to offer its technologies for use in a wider range of applications and service offerings.

“Awarepoint’s success is already remarkable. With the current attention being focused on opportunities for wireless communications in healthcare, Awarepoint is poised for significant growth. I look forward to sharing my experience and advice at this inflection point in technology solutions for the worldwide healthcare market,” said Zander.

  • http://3gdoctor.wordpress.com David Doherty

    Good find, I agree it adds a lot of credibility when we find top telecom executives who recognize wireless healthcare as a key opportunity for the telecom industry.

    Hans Snook is another formidable telecom guy (Founder and CEO of Orange PLC and exChairman of Europes leading mobile retailer – Carphone Warehouse PLC) who has since 2007 been a shareholder and Chairman of Smartphone Health Monitoring company Health Smart (healthsmart.co.uk)

  • ZanderTheLoser

    You’re doomed. He killed Sun. He lied to Sun’s customers. He drove Motorola’s phone business into irrelevancy, and now they belong to Google after huge market share losses on his watch. Why *does* this guy keep getting a job? He should be in a breadline somewhere. On his watch, Motorola was left behind in the smartphone business. Fortunately they had a bunch of patents to make them attractive to Google.