JAMA

By Jonah Comstock April 13, 2016
As their famous rallying cry states, the patients behind the Nightscout project for creating a do-it-yourself mobile technology for diabetes management are not waiting for approval from the FDA. But that doesn't mean they aren't seeking it, or that they haven't been in contact with the regulatory organization to make sure Nightscout is as safe as it can be. In a new editorial published in the...
By Jonah Comstock April 5, 2016
A study of eight leading telemedicine companies shows that, for a number of common conditions, remote video and telephone visits are equally accurate, both are more accurate than webchat, and accuracy of diagnoses and adherence to best practices for in-person care varied greatly from company to company. In the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, UCSF-affiliated...
By Jonah Comstock March 22, 2016
A new paper published yesterday in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that, when it comes to measuring energy expenditure, many leading fitness trackers have a margin of error of about 200 calories per day in either direction. The study was conducted by Japanese researchers led by Haruka Murakami from the National Institute of Health and Nutrition in Tokyo. Nineteen participants, aged 21 to 50, wore 12...
By Jonah Comstock September 24, 2015
A relatively large randomized control trial in Australia has shown that a text messaging program can improve not only health behaviors, but actually affect health outcomes. The 2-year study of 710 patients with coronary heart disease, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that six months of a text messaging intervention produced significant reduction in cholesterol,...
By Jonah Comstock June 3, 2015
Last week, JAMA Internal Medicine published a two-page research letter by the Rand Corporation that played into a national conversation about the efficacy of telemedicine -- specifically Teladoc, a company which is both about to IPO and embroiled in a potentially precedent-setting legal battle with its home state of Texas over whether the Texas Medical Board has the right to regulate the practice...
By Aditi Pai May 28, 2015
Physicians who meet with patients via direct to consumer telemedicine services are just as likely to prescribe antibiotics as those who conduct in-person visits, according to a study conducted by Rand Corporation. The study was published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine. The study examined health plan claims from 1,725 patients who used telemedicine...
By Jonah Comstock April 20, 2015
Two of the biggest medical journals in the world have taken up some big picture mobile health questions this week: How are patients to know which medical apps work out of the sea of available options, and should healthy patients be making use of mobile health apps and devices at all? The first question is the subject of a recent article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, while...
By Jonah Comstock March 19, 2015
Fitness wearables are big these days. Going on a tenth of the population has them, their visibility is on the rise through TV commercials, and even the President is talking about getting one. And, of course, the upcoming Apple Watch will feature fitness tracking functionality. So it's no surprise that headlines that take the wind out of wearables are, as Wired's Brent Rose puts it in a new piece...
By Jonah Comstock October 22, 2014
In the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers from Castlight Health have published what they believe is the first study linking price transparency to cost savings. The study of more than 500,000 Castlight users demonstrated modest savings for lab tests, advanced imaging, and clinician office visits. "Although it is widely perceived that greater transparency of pricing...
By Aditi Pai November 5, 2013
Patients may start spending less time in the doctors office as electronic health records and patient-facing medical apps proliferate, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, which appears in the journal Health Affairs, looked at health informatics and health services research literature through June 2013 using Medline, the Cochrane Database and...