Manhattan Research

By Jonah Comstock February 25, 2015
Paul Ivans As payors and providers advance toward outcomes-based medicine, that shift is affecting pharmaceutical companies as well. As decisions about prescribing shift away from the doctor, who has been the primary recipient of pharma marketing for the past 20 years, to the C-level of integrated delivery networks (IDNs) and accountable care organizations (ACOs), pharma is going to have to...
By Jonah Comstock February 24, 2015
Monique Levy, VP of Research at Manhattan Research Although there's a lot of buzz about wearables and a lot of talk about tablets, the best digital channel to reach patients and consumers is still the smartphone, according to Manhattan Research's Monique Levy. At the ePharma Summit in New York City, Levy shared some data with an assembled crowd of pharma marketers about how patients use mobile...
By Jonah Comstock May 29, 2014
More than a third of US physicians recommended that a patient use a health app, according to the newest addition of Manhattan Research's Taking the Pulse survey, which details physician mobile and digital health adoption each year. The online survey included 3,066 practicing physicians across a variety of practices. The research group released a smattering of data that suggested physicians'...
By Brian Dolan April 29, 2014
Manhattan Research, a division of Decision Resources Group, released a few topline findings from its annual Taking the Pulse Global study this week, including that 80 percent of physicians in China now own or use smartphones for professional purposes. That puts China's doctors almost on par with those in the US in terms of smartphone usage. The study also found that now more than 75 percent of...
By Brian Dolan April 17, 2014
After a few years of similar data points, Manhattan Research's Director of Physician Research James Avallone feels confident that smartphone adoption among physicians in the US has plateaued. "We have seen this number in the low 80s since 2011 -- it's been static," Avallone said. "In 2010 we were at 72 percent of physicians and then the following year we hit four out of five. Since then it's...
By Jonah Comstock January 27, 2014
When it comes to reading articles in medical journals, 28 percent of physicians use tablets and 21 percent use smartphones according to a recently published study by ad agency WPP's Kantar Media. That's still much lower than the 74 percent that use a desktop or laptop computer or the 55 percent still reading paper journals. Kantar Media surveyed 3,000 doctors across 22 specialties over two...
By Aditi Pai November 26, 2013
The year is drawing to a close, and as some take the time to look back on personal highlights, we've taken the time to compile some mobile health highlights, mostly through numbers. While bigger research companies have forecasted potential growth in the space four or five years ahead, other surveys and studies offer different takeaways on digital health today -- from iPad vs iPhone comparisons to...
By Jonah Comstock October 29, 2013
WebMD's mobile app, an example of an app smartphone users might use for health information. As of 2013, 95 million Americans are using mobile phones as health tools or to find health information, according to Manhattan Research. That's 27 percent more than 2012, when the number was 75 million. These numbers come from Manhattan's annual Cybercitizen Health US survey. The research firm surveyed...
By Aditi Pai May 9, 2013
One again, Epocrates tops the list as the most popular app for physicians, according to Manahattan Research's Taking the Pulse 2013 survey results. Of the 2,950 physicians surveyed, Epocrates was used by 70 percent of physicians via their smartphones and 50 percent via tablet devices. Epocrates, which was acquired by athenahealth in January, provides physicians with a range of medical reference...
By Jonah Comstock April 18, 2013
Manhattan Research shared a few more numbers from its annual "Taking the Pulse" online research survey of 2,950 physicians in a webinar this week. The numbers showed that smartphone, desktop and laptop use has leveled out among physicians while tablet adoption has risen to 72 percent, up from 62 percent last year. The 62 percent number was a surprise for Manhattan last year, more than doubling...

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